It’s Time for Smart Law

This is not legal automation; this is legal disruption.

Let me be clear: I think lawyers in the future will still be looking for facts, asking and answering hard questions, and helping clients make decisions. But I believe this will take place in an entirely new context, with new questions, new kinds of answers, and more automated and software-augmented decisions and resolutions, with oracles and new governance models and dynamic adjustment as conditions change. This is not your grandfather’s legal system. Just the practice of resolving disputes could change entirely. Governance is undergoing a serious transformation. Securities laws are being routed around. Identity is changing. The kinds of answers that the next-generation of lawyers will give their clients will be very different, and it will be critical to understand the world of law-as-code and code-as-law, and to know the difference between the two.

  • Mutual nondisclosure
  • Work product for hire
  • Employment contract
  • Rental leases
  • Company formation
  • Bylaws
  • Operating agreements
  • Will
  • Homeowner’s documents
  • End user license agreement
  • Terms of use
  • Loans

Join the CodeIsLaw Slack now

The New Lawyers
Most lawyers in their 40s and 50s today, who are at the peak of their career’s earning potential, won’t participate in this. Surprisingly, a few established firms are leading the way. But most of the people we’re looking for are young, ambitious, and want to change the world. Here is a selection of law firms and thinkers I believe are helping guide clients into this new world. If you know of others, please contact me and I’ll add them:

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David Siegel

David Siegel

10.8K Followers

Provocateur, professional heretic, slayer of myths, speaker of truthiness to powerfulness, and defender of the Oxford comma.